About the City

Mandaue, officially the City of Mandaue (Cebuano: Dakbayan sa Mandaue; Filipino: Lungsod ng Mandaue) and often referred to as Mandaue City, is a highly urbanized city in the region of Central Visayas (Region VII), Philippines. It is one of three highly urbanized cities on Cebu island and forms a part of the Cebu Metropolitan area.[5] Mandaue City is located on the central-eastern coastal region of Cebu; its southwest coast borders the northeast of Mactan Island, where Lapu-Lapu City is located. Mandaue is connected to Mactan Island via two bridges: the Mactan-Mandaue Bridge and Marcelo Fernan Bridge,[6] and is bounded south and the west by the provincial capital, Cebu City, and north by Consolacion, to which it is linked by the Cansaga Bay Bridge. The city has an area of 2,518 ha (6,220 acres). According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 362,654.[3] In the 2016 electoral roll, it had 189,712 registered voters.[4]

Mandaue City is part of the Sixth District of Cebu joined with the municipalities of Consolacion and Cordova. Although qualified for a lone district since 1991, this was neglected by lawmakers. Mandaue is an independent highly urbanized city but is legislatively administered with the supervision of the provincial government.

History

A community was established in Mandaue by a flourishing group of Austronesian people. The Venetian chronicler Antonio Pigafettawrote of a settlement called Mandani which existed in the area with a chieftain named Apo Noan[7] then a few decades later another ruler named Lambuzzan.[8]

Mandaue natives were forced into a town as decreed by the Spanish authorities. This may have started off as a mission village (which included present day Consolacion, Liloan and Poro) serving as a bulwark for the church in the northern Cebu and was managed by the Jesuit in 1638 then a century later by the Recollects.[9]

The Philippine revolution in 1898 gave the town a new form of administration in accordance with the organic decree of the Central Revolutionary Government. The short-lived revolution was overthrown by the American Troops and a battle nearly destroyed the town in 1901, killing Presidente Benito Ceniza.[10]

Mandaue became independent from being an American Commonwealth and a Japanese garrison on July 4, 1946 along with the entire nation. Mandaue became a chartered city on June 21, 1969. The city was recognized as a HUC (Highly Urbanized City) in 1991.[11]

Geography

The city has a total area of 34.87 km2 (13.46 sq mi). According to the 2015 census, the population density is 10,000/km2(26,000/sq mi).

The city is the 6th smallest government unit in terms of land area; among the Metro Cebu local government units the city is the second smallest next to the municipality of Cordova in the island of Mactan. The city's land area is only 4.5% of the total land area of Metro Cebu and less than 1% of the total land of the province of Cebu.

The ongoing North Reclamation Project, now known as the North Special Administrative Zone, currently has about 180 ha (440 acres) reclaimed land. Of the 180 hectares, about 36 ha (89 acres) belong to the city. The existing mangrove area will be retained as a marine habitat, part of the area's parks and open spaces.

It is one of the two (the other one being the municipality of Consolacion) local government units located within the mainland Metro Cebu where the elevation of land is less than 100 m (330 ft).

Many of the areas of the city are extremely flat. About 77.37% is within the 0-8% slope category. Barangays belonging to this region are Centro, Looc, South Special Administrative Zone, Cambaro, Opao, Umapad, Paknaan, Alang-alang, Tipolo, Ibabao, Guizo, Subangdaku, Mantuyong, Maguikay and Tabok. The greater portion of the city, comprising about 70%, is dominated by the Mandaue Clay Loam soil series. This is found in the 0-2% and 2-5% slope ranges. Faraon clay loam characterizes the rest of the land with slope range from 5-8% and up to 25-40%.[12]